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K12 Digital Citizenship: Lessons

This guide provides resources to help K-12 students be proactive digital citizens.

Kindergarten

Lesson Title: Seasons: Impact in Nature

 

Grade level: Kindergarten

 

Subject: Science

 

Lesson Overview: Seasons impact nature. In temperate zones, nature has predictable seasonal characteristics. Some aspects of seasons are the same, regardless of climate, and others differ because of latitude and geography. Information about the seasons can be garnered from visuals.

 

Time Frame: 1-2 hours

 

Learning Objectives: learners will

  • Explain seasonal weather.
  • Identify characteristics of different seasons.
  • Explain how seasonal weather affects animals and humans.
  • Gain meaning from images that are communicated digitally.
     

Science Standards (aligned with Common Core):

  • Students know changes in weather occur from day to day and across seasons, affecting Earth and its inhabitants.
  • Observe common objects by using the five senses.
  • Describe the properties of common objects.

 

Library Standards (aligned with Common Core):

  • Understand the concept that printed and digital materials provide information by identifying meaning from simple symbols and pictures. 
  • Identify types of everyday print and digital materials such as story books, poems, newspapers, periodicals, signs, and labels.

 

Resources:

  • Technology: Internet-connected computer (with sound) with data projector and screen; installed Google Earth (optional)
  • Worksheets (masters found at Teacher’s section of http://www.nationalgeographic.com/ngyoungexplorer/0904/ )
  • Writing/drawing instruments
  • Supplies for vocabulary chart/wall as appropriate

 

Planning for Diverse Learners:

  • Have students work in pairs (one typical and one with needs, such as language or physical limitations).
  • Have students demonstrate knowledge orally, by drawing, by pointing.
  • Read the story aloud to students.

 

Instructional Strategies and Learning Activities:

  1. Prepare for the lesson by setting up technology. Create vocabulary cards/wall as needed. Preview the websites.

 

  1. Ask students what season they are experiencing now. Ask what are nature characteristics of the season (such as status of plants, clothing, temperature, length of daylight). As they respond, write simple words or images on a writing surface.

 

  1. Ask students what are the other seasons. Ask what are nature characteristics of each season. A grid can be constructed to show the different seasons.

 

FALL

WINTER

SPRING

SUMMER

WEATHER

fog

snow

rain

sun

PLANTS

Red leaves

No leaves

flowers

Dry plants

TEMPERATURE

Cool

Cold

Cool

Warm

Some children might not know the answers, which is fine because they will learn during this class.

 

  1. Play the season song found at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LTXtSGf1VdY (if the computer has sound). Encourage students to respond as appropriate.

 

  1. Ask students how the seasons impact them, such as the clothing they wear, their play habits, or the food they eat (such as seasonal fruit). Ask them how it impacts animals. Then show the National Geographic stories about the forest in different seasons, starting with the present season. Students can take turns clicking on the page turn icon.

The Forest in Fall: http://www.nationalgeographic.com/ngyoungexplorer/0809/readstory.html  (includes a section on maps)

The Forest in Winter:

http://www.nationalgeographic.com/ngyoungexplorer/0811/readstory.html (has worksheet on weather by day)

The Forest in Spring: http://www.nationalgeographic.com/ngyoungexplorer/0904/readstory.html -- has worksheet on animal changes by season.

After the first season, ask students how that season affects each kind of animal. Refer to the pictures, and point out the visual information (such as color, length of fur, body language). Divide the class into the four animal groups, and ask them to focus on that animal for the other two seasons. After each season, ask each group to state how their animal is impacted by the weather, backing their answers by the visual information. Note that there is not a story about the forest in summer. Ask students to predict what the forest would be like in summer, and have them explain why. Students might also state how the vegetation differs.

 

  1. Show “wild weather” images at http://kids.nationalgeographic.com/kids/photos/gallery/wild-weather/. Ask students to identify the season for each, giving the reason for their choice. The teacher can extend the lesson by showing the location of each site on a globe, map, or Google Earth. Alternatively, find images of weather or seasons on http://www.askkids.com. Ask students if they agree about the choice of images generated, and the basis for their decision.

 

  1. Ask students if a season is the same around the world. Ask them why it might be different. This is shown in Forests in Fall (maps) and Forests in Winter (photo spread). Using Google Earth or a geographic map, show them latitude differences, explaining that at the equator, it is warmer, and near the poles it is colder. Similarly, it is colder in the mountains, and warmer during the day in many deserts. Explain that some aspects of seasons are the same throughout the world, such as length of day. Time of the year differs by hemisphere.

 

  1. Replay the season song, and ask students to identify the visual cues about weather.  Have students complete the animal changes worksheet.

 

Variations:

  • Break up the lesson into different parts, as needed.
  • Focus on times of the day.
  • Focus on types of weather.
  • Focus on geography and weather.
  • Focus on plants and seasons.
  • Weather snapshot by day (see Forest in Fall worksheet).
  • Focus on activities at different seasons (http://www.activityvillage.co.uk/seasonal_pages.htm).
  • Study the reason for seasons: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DuiQvPLWziQ.
  • Have students find images for seasons (can be clip art), and then sort them by season (can do counter-examples).
  • Use images from print resources.

 

Student Assessment:

Learners are assessed by observation, oral expression or written work. For instance, students can explain orally or draw what the weather might be during different seasons, depending on the location. The National Geographic worksheet on animal changes can be used as an assessment. The criteria for assessment include:

Identify characteristics of different seasons: accuracy, completeness of answer

Explain how seasonal weather affects animals and humans: accuracy, completeness of answer

Interpret visual information: accuracy, completeness of answer

 

Additional Resources:

 

2nd Grade

Lesson Title: Family Names on the Land

 

Grade level: 2

 

Subject: Social Studies

 

Lesson Overview: Families come from different countries, and so do words. The meaning and origin of a family name might be the same as the family itself, or it may differ. Both facts can be valuable. Students do  need to be careful about sharing family information, though, so it doesn’t migrate to strangers.

 

Time Frame: 1 class period and second day follow-up

 

Learning Objectives: learners will

  • Research the country origin and meaning of their family surname.
  • Locate their family’s origin and surname origin on a map, with adult help.
  • Explain the concept of migration.
  • Explain why family origin and surname origins might differ.
  • Explain why one should not share family information with strangers.

 

Social Studies Standards (aligned with Common Core):

  • Trace the history of a family through the use of primary and secondary sources, including artifacts, photographs, interviews, and documents.
  • Students explain how the present is connected to the past, identifying both similarities and differences between the two, and how some things change over time and some things stay the same.
  • Students use map and globe skills to determine the absolute locations of places and interpret information available through a map's or globe's legend, scale, and symbolic representations

 

Library Standards (aligned with Common Core):

Understand the concept of keywords

Independently check out and care for a variety of library resources including technology devices.

Identify who to ask for help when online at the school library or in the classroom.

Identify types of everyday print, media, and digital resources using academic vocabulary (e.g., biography, periodical, database, fiction, nonfiction, primary source).

Connect prior knowledge to the information and events in text and digital formats.

Identify trusted and knowledgeable people to ask for assistance with an information search (e.g., teacher, teacher librarian, family).

Identify nonfiction text structures in print and digital formats (e.g., main idea and supporting details, cause and effect, compare and contrast, sequencing).

Draw meaning from illustrations, photographs, diagrams, charts, graphs, maps, and captions.

Demonstrate proper procedures and good citizenship in the library and online.

Understand that just as there are strangers face-to-face, there are also strangers on the Internet.

Adhere to privacy (nondisclosure of personal or family information) and safety guidelines (laws and policies) when using the Internet at school or home.

Record and present information with pictures, bar graphs, numbers, or written statements.

 

Resources:

Technology: Internet-connected demonstration computer with data projector and screen; at least 1 computer for every 2 students

http://www.last-names.net/

Supplies for vocabulary signs/cards for vocabulary wall/chart as appropriate

Writing supplies and writing surfaces

World map that can be written/drawn on

World and USA outline maps for each student (http://www.worldatlas.com/webimage/testmaps/usanames.htm, http://www.worldatlas.com/aatlas/worldout.htm)

 

Planning for Diverse Learners:

  • Have students work in pairs (one typical and one with needs, such as language or physical limitations).
  • Have students share equipment if there is limited access to it.
  • Be sensitive to students with unknown family origins; they can trace the word origin of their surname and link with the website’s geographic distribution of surname families.

 

Instructional Strategies and Learning Activities:

  1. Prepare for the lesson by printing maps for each student. Preview websites (check sample name to make sure it is available on the website). Set up equipment.
  2. Ask students where their families originate. Using a map, show where your family originated, visually tracing a line back from current, to another part of the US (as appropriate) to the land of origin. For example: Los Angeles from Seattle from Minneapolis from Stockholm. Give each student a world map and a USA map, and ask them to get that information from their families. Remind them that sometimes people don’t know where their families originated, and that’s OK. Tell them that they can trace either side of the family. Remind students that this information is to be kept in class, and not shared with people outside of class. If parents do not give permission, students can trace a famous person’s family, such as a President.
  3. Words also have origins as well as meanings. Family/surnames have meaning, such as a job (e.g., Smith), family connection (e.g., Johnson), color (e.g., Brown), or religious (e.g., Singh means hero). They also have geographic origins  (e.g., Smith is English, and the equivalent Schmidt is German). People also have adopted names, and servants or slaves sometimes took their masters’ surname.
  4. Show http://www.last-names.net/, and type in a student’s name (or other sample name) to find out its origin. Also name the geographic distribution chart of the family surname in the USA. Explain the population legend. Look at different time periods, and ask students if they see a pattern in migration (explain the term).
  5. If possible, have students logon to computers, and search their surnames. Have them write down the name, country origin, and meaning. With help (or at home), have students trace the surname from their current state to the country of origin on the world map (in a different color than their family migration). Ideally, have them note the number of families in their current state over time. Ask students to compare their words with a partner. Lead a class discussion on word meanings and origins. To show patterns, mark the country of origin for each name to see if patterns emerge. Explain that counting is a good way to find patterns in information.
  6. On the second day, ask students if their surname origin and family origin are the same or different. Discuss why the two origins might differ. If two students have the same name, compare their family maps. Pair students to compare maps.
  7. Show students the same website, and note that the user can search for family records, and input family information. Discuss the consequences of such actions. State that people should be careful when sharing their information with strangers, and that students should never share personal family information without parent permission. 
  8. Debrief about family and word meanings, origins, and migration. Discuss about Internet safety relative to personal information sharing.

 

Variations:

Trace famous people’s family and surname migration.

Trace book character family and surname migration.

Create family trees.

Search word families (e.g., http://www.visuwords.com/)

Search other word origins (e.g., http://www.fun-with-words.com/etymology.html)

 

Student Assessment:

Learners are assessed via observation (class participation and on-task work online), class discussion, and maps. Criteria for assessment include:

  • Accuracy and thoroughness of geographic location tracking
  • Accuracy and thoroughness of word meaning and origin
  • Appropriate use of technology
  • Differentiation between surname and family origin and migration
  • Accurate and appropriate use of vocabulary (e.g., migration, origin)

 

Additional Resources:

Behind the Name  http://www.behindthename.com/

Name Meanings  http://www.name-meanings.com/index.php

Baby Name Wizard  http://www.babynamewizard.com/namevoyager.html/lnv0105.html

Baby Name Worlds (has pregnancy info)  http://babynamesworld.parentsconnect.com/

Behind the SurName  http://surnames.behindthename.com/

Last Name Meanings  http://www.last-names.net/

Internet Surname Database  http://www.surnamedb.com/

Etymology’s View if the World  http://www.spiegel.de/fotostrecke/fotostrecke-37310.html

Native Names map  http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2009/04/departments/native-names-interactive

Atlas of  True Names  http://www.kalimedia.com/Atlas_of_True_Names.html

Country Name Etymologies  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_country_name_etymologies

Country name etymologies  http://www.fact-index.com/l/li/list_of_country_name_etymologies.html

 

4th Grade

Lesson Title: Journeying the Globe

 

Grade level: 4

 

Subject: Social Studies

 

Lesson Overview: Students learn coordinate

 

Time Frame: 2 class periods

 

Learning Objectives: Specific locations, and their relationship to other locations, is important to humans. Thus, a system of coordinates provides a standard way to locate sites. By using Google Earth, students can visualize how the coordinates work.


 

Social Studies Standards:

  • Explain and use the coordinate grid system of latitude and longitude to determine the absolute locations of places in California and on Earth.
  • Distinguish between the North and South Poles; the equator and the prime meridian; the tropics; and the hemispheres, using coordinates to plot locations.

 

Library Standards (aligned with Common Core):

  • Interpret information presented visually, orally, or quantitatively (e.g., in charts, graphs, diagrams, time lines, animations, or interactive elements on Web pages) and explain how the information contributes to an understanding of the text in which it appears.
  • With some guidance and support from adults, use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing as well as to interact and collaborate with others; demonstrate sufficient command of keyboarding skills to type a minimum of one page in a single sitting.
  • Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience in an organized manner, using appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive, details to support main ideas or themes; speak clearly at an understandable pace.

 

Resources:

  • Technology: Internet-connected demonstration computer with projector and screen; one Internet-connected computer for every pair of students (or 1-to-1 computers); computers should have a word-processing software application.
  • Google Earth
  • Print atlases (optional)

 

Planning for Diverse Learners:

  • Have students work in pairs (one typical and one with needs, such as language or physical limitations).
  • Have students share equipment if there is limited access to it.

 

Instructional Strategies and Learning Activities:

  1. Prepare for the lesson by making sure that Google Earth is accessible through all the computers. Create vocabulary words/cards for vocabulary chart/wall as appropriate. Prepare a few latitude/longitudinal sets (e.g., 38°33’23.05”, -121°33’45.87”).

 

  1. Open Google Earth. Ask students to point to North and South Poles; the equator and the prime meridian; the tropics; and the hemispheres. Point to and explain each item as needed. Generate a vocabulary list as appropriate.

 

  1. Explain latitude and longitude, and their significance.

 

  1. Go to Google Maps, and type in the school’s town. Note the latitude and longitude on the bottom bar. Try typing in just the numbers before the period, and find out the location (which can be a specific site such as the Eiffel Tower). Ask students to explain the results, and correct them as needed. Be sure to note the importance of the minus sign (and reference meridian via the set ); for instance, type the inverse of the location set (e.g., 37.407229, -122.107162) to see results. (NOTE: go into Google Tools Options to see different ways that longitude/latitude are written). For students to get an idea about the distance of a degree, type in one degree differences, and see the results (good visual effect in Google Earth).  Have students suggest a couple of sites, and a couple of locational sets, to see the results.

 

  1. Have each student go to Google Earth, and create a journey using five locational sets, each of which is a significant site, following a “Mad Lib” type of  template. Have students print out two copies of their journey sheet. Ask them to complete one, and give the other copy to a peer to complete.  Alternatively, students can write in the site, and have the peer generate the locational set (the originator still has to write down the current numbers on his/her worksheet). To scaffold learning, have students complete a first journey that is developed by the teacher (as a check for understanding).

      JOURNEY TEMPLATE:

(student’s name)_______________ started on their journey at (locational set #1)________________ where he (action) ___________________. He flew to (locational set #2:__ 48°51’31.83”, 2°17’39.66”__) where he __walked up the Eiffel Tower__  ….   He finally made it to his final destination (locational set #5) where he (action) _________________. 

 

5.   Debrief students about the vocabulary and concepts.

 

Variations:

  • Use different locational set systems.
  • Change the geographic range (e.g., within one state or country).
  • Use Google Maps.
  • Have students go through the Google Maps tutorial.
  • Have students use print atlases, or compare results with digital maps.
  • Focus on the history of coordinate systems.

 

Student Assessment:

Learners are assessed by their class participation and journey. The teacher can have students draw a globe, and mark/label the vocabulary.

Criteria include:

  • Accuracy of locational sets
  • Appropriateness of actions related to the locational sets

Agreement between the two worksheets is one indicator of accuracy.

6th Grade

Lesson Title: Editing Plagiarism Out

 

Grade level: 6

 

Subject: English

 

Lesson Overview: One reason that students plagiarize is because they do not know how to extract information effectively. One of the tips in locating key points in an information source is to know how the information is structured; different types of documents have unique information “architecture.” In this lesson, students learn how newspaper articles are structured, and how to extract information automatically and analytically.

 

Time Frame: 1 class period

 

Learning Objectives: learners will

  • Write a plagiarism-free précis of a newspaper article
  • Explain ways to extract information
  • Explain newspaper writing structure

 

Content Standards (aligned with Common Core):

  • Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing as well as to interact and collaborate with others,
  • Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources; assess the credibility of each source; and quote or paraphrase the data and conclusions of others while avoiding plagiarism and providing basic bibliographic information for sources.
  • Interpret information presented in diverse media and formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) and explain how it contributes to a topic, text, or issue under study.

 

Library Standards (aligned with Common Core):

  • Collaborate in person and through technology to identify problems and seek their solutions.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of current applications available online (e.g., photo organizer, presentation generator, document creator, video conferencing).
  • Understand how to provide limited copyright and authorize use of original works (e.g., Creative Commons).
  • Restate facts and details taken from an information source (print, nonprint, or digital) and organize those ideas for note taking using techniques such as outlining, webbing, flowcharting, etc.

 

Resources:

  • Technology: demo Internet-connected computer with data projector and screen; class set of Internet-connected computers, all of which should have Word software
  • Online newspaper articles

 

Planning for Diverse Learners:

  • Have students work in pairs (one typical and one with needs, such as language or physical limitations)
  • Have students share equipment if there is limited access to it.
  • Provide choice of information sources.
  • Provide more structure for the task or divide the steps into substeps.
  • Topics may be sensitive for some students, so they should be able to choose their topics.

 

Instructional Strategies and Learning Activities:

  1. Prepare for the lesson by locating and downloading a newspaper article, and pasting it into a word processing document (ideally, Word) into one column (use text boxes) of a two-column page.
  2. Explain to students that extracting information is a useful research technique and comprehension aid.
  3. Project the selected article, and ask students to identify key nouns; highlight them. Ask students to identify key sentences; underline them. Make sure students justify their choices. Save the file. Ask students for other ways to extract information. Remind them that newspaper articles usually have a predictable structure, which helps in extracting information.
  4. Open another copy of the newspaper article. Show the autosummarize function in Word, and see how it handles summarizing the article. Compare the two transformation.
  5. With students, write a précis of the article using original words in the second column of the first copy of the newspaper article.
  6. Have student pairs locate a newspaper article, each from a different part of the newspaper (or the teacher can assign it), and highlight, underline, and write a précis. Then have them compare their original work with the autosummary.
  7. Have students exchange précis, and compare the original and précis. Have students assess the précis using the rubric (http://handheld.tie.net/content/docs/Water%20Slide%20Abstract%20Rubric%20lynn.pdf).
  8. Debrief the process, noting that different sections of newspapers are written differently. Ask students to give tips to write précis of newspaper articles.

 

Variations:

  • Summarize different types of documents.
  • Vary the percentage of document reduction.
  • Compare a magazine abstract and the full article.

 

Student Assessment:

Learners are assessed by observation of online behavior, collaboration, and class participation; and by précis and evaluation. Criteria for assessment include:

  • Quality of writing
  • Accurate, insightful summary/précis of newspaper article
  • Quality of assessment
  • Appropriate online behavior
  • Quality of collaboration

 

8th Grade

Lesson Title: Exercise Cycles

 

Grade level: 8

 

Subject: Physical education (exercise)

 

Lesson Overview: As teens make decisions about physical fitness exercise, they need to know how to locate and evaluate relevant information. They also need to think about their privacy as they seek such information. This lesson examines the communication cycle, and notes how information technology impacts it. It also addresses how communication is recorded and shared, which can impact privacy. Both legal and ethical issues are addressed.

 

Time Frame: 2 class periods

 

Learning Objectives: learners will

            - Describe how to find information about exercise issues.
            - Evaluate sources of information.
            - Explain the impact of technology on locating and sharing information.
 

Physical education Standards:
            - Analyze the validity of exercise information, products, and services.
            - Use a decision-making process to examine barriers to making healthy decisions

              about exercise and exercise products.
            - Use a decision-making process to analyze when it is necessary to seek help with

                or avoid an unhealthy situation.  
            - Support others in making positive and healthful choices about exercise.

 

Library Standards:
            - Select and use appropriate tools and technology to locate resources.
            - Use a variety of print, media and online resources to locate information

               including encyclopedias and other reference materials.
            - Analyze media for purpose, message, accuracy, bias, and intended audience.
            - Determine whether resources are designed to persuade, educate, inform, or sell.
            - Recognize and protect the private information of oneself and others.

 

Common Core Standards:

  • Conduct short research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question), drawing on several sources and generating additional related, focused questions that allow for multiple avenues of exploration.
  • Read and comprehend science/technical texts in the grades 6-8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.
  • Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, using search terms effectively; assess the credibility and accuracy of each source.
  • Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent manner with relevant evidence, sound valid reasoning, and well-chosen details; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.
  • Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 8 topics, texts and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.

 

Resources:

  • Technology: Internet-connected computers, demonstration computer with projector/screen
  • Worksheet:
  1. Issue:
  2. Communications channel:

                        Public or private? Likely to be recorded/archived?
                        Potential number of people who could access/receive the message:

  1. Audience/receiver:

Likely type of information to be provided:
Likelihood of keeping communication private:
Likelihood of sharing communication (making it public):

  1. Consequences of interloping (to interloper and target person):

      5.   Recommendations for locating and sharing information:

 

Planning for Diverse Learners:

  • Learners can work in same-sex pairs.
  • Choice of information sources varies by reading level.
  • TLs provide more structure for the task or divide the steps into substeps.

 

Instructional Strategies and Learning Activities:

0. Before the lesson, TL sets up computers. TL prints worksheet.

 

1. Teacher librarian (TL) explains the communication cycle. The communication cycle begins with an idea that someone tries to communicate to another person, usually with in the intent that the receiving party responds. The communication channel can impact the message and its receiver/audience. While a response to the sender is typically completes the loop, the audience could communicate to other parties. An image of the communication cycle is found at http://www.media-visions.com/communication.html.
            This model also works for seeking information, with the intent that the receiver provides the sender with the needed information. The sender’s choice of communications channel impacts who will receive the query. The communications channel may be public (open to anyone) or private (directed to an intended receiver), and the message may be documented or not. The sender also needs to think about the receiver in terms of whether the message will be sent only to the sender (a closed cycle) or might be communicated to others (an open cycle).
            Learners as information seekers/senders need to think about the communication channel, the receiver, and privacy factors. Particularly since issues of relationships and sexual health may be sensitive in nature, learners often do not want their communication to be made public. Furthermore, they might not realize the consequences of sharing such information. This lesson helps them understand these issues.
 

2. TL and physical education (PE) teacher ask learners to brainstorm exercise plans, products and services that require information seeking. Here is a beginning list (which may be used as the lesson topics):
- A middle school boy wants to build up muscle. He wants what exercises he can at home without buying equipment. 
- Friends tell a middle school girl she has baby fat. She wants to lose it immediately, and is thinking of buying pills to speed up the process.
- A family is going to buy some home exercise equipment, and the middle schooler wants to research what would be appropriate for his age.
 

3. TL asks learners to brainstorm technology-based communication channels that could be used to get the desired information. Alternatively, the following list may be used as a guiding or final list.
- telephone conversation
- smart phone texting
- email
- Internet searching
- Facebook/social network query
 

4. TL and PE teacher split the class into groups according to communication channel. Have each group identify if their channel is public or private. Have student groups also identify whether their channel records/archives the information. Have them research how many people might potentially access the information (e.g., http://www.facebook.com/press/info.php?statistics).
 

5. TL and PE ask learners to brainstorm likely receivers/audience of the query. Examples include: parent, teacher, friend, recreation center, doctor, commercial gym, social agency. Have each student within each group choose to be one receiver. Have each identify the likely kind of information that they would give (e.g., clergy would advise abstinence, doctor would give medical information, etc.). If learners are unsure about what kind of information that would be given, have them research it (e.g., using Internet search engine or database aggregator key word combinations such as “exercise OR fitness” and “equipment”). Have each group discuss their findings.
 

6. TL and PE ask learners to predict whether their source of information (receiver/respondent) would be likely to: 1) respond directly to them; 2) tell others about the communication. If learners are unsure about what kind of information that would be given, have them research the answer (e.g.,
 

7. TL and PE teacher ask learners to discuss within their group about the consequences of the communications cycle being open/public.
 

8. TL poses the question: “What if someone were to overhear/access the query?” What might be the consequences? For instance, if someone saw a teenage girl walking into a Jenny Craig center, and told others that the girl was a fatty when she really was waiting for her mother, what would be the consequences for the: 1) girl who visited, and 2) person/interloper who told others untrue gossip? Have groups discuss the issue and ramifications. Some of the terminology that might arise includes: libel, slander, false representation; these terms can be researched by the groups.
 

9. TL and PE teacher ask each group to report out their findings and predictions about consequences of actions. If the class is large, split them into two or three groups, each with a separate issue.
 

10. TL and PE teacher conduct a class debriefing about locating and sharing information via technology about exercise issues. Have the class develop guidelines for behaviors relative to technology use.
 

Variations:

  • Another health topic can be addressed.
  • Boys and girls can compare their perspectives and information found.
  • The class can focus on just one aspect of exercise: one part of the body, one reason for exercising (muscle vs. weight).
  • The class can focus on exercise equipment.
  • The class can locate information on the Internet, comparing sources of information.
  • The class can compare information found on the “free” Internet vs. subscription databases.
  • The class can start by doing the following WebQuest on diet and exercise: http://www.viterbo.edu/academic/ug/education/edu250/vawall/

 

Student Assessment:

Learners are assessed in according to their communication thoroughness, validity, and justification for the following criteria:

  • following directions
  • documenting work
  • information/conducting research
  • understanding the communication cycle
  • understanding the impact of technology
  • understanding issues of privacy
  • making recommendations for decision making.

 

Additional Resources:

  • http://www.bam.gov/index.html
  • http://www.shapeup.org/
  • http://www.lensaunders.com/aces/aces.html
  • http://kidshealth.org/kid/
  • http://www.presidentschallenge.org/challenge/active/index.shtml

 

10th Grade

Lesson Title: Country and Technology Timeline

 

Grade level: 10

 

Subject: Social Studies

 

Lesson Overview: Timelines are a useful way to sequence events. The mesh of images and textual information helps students find conceptual patterns and remember them. This lesson also helps students leverage Boolean searching to make cognitive links between concepts. This lesson also shows how collaboration can facilitate research.

 

Time Frame: 1 class period

 

Learning Objectives: learners will

  • Locate images of countries and technology
  • Cognitively link countries’ integration into the world with technology
  • Interpret and draw conclusions from articles.
  • Cite articles accurately

 

Social Studies Standards:

  • Students analyze the integration of countries into the world economy and the information, technological, and communications revolutions (e.g., television, satellites, computers).

 

Library Standards (aligned with Language Arts and Common Core):

  • Analyze information from multiple sources and identify complexities, discrepancies, and different perspectives found among sources.
  • Explain how meaning is conveyed in images.
  • Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products, taking advantage of technology’s capacity to link to other information and to display information flexibly and dynamically.
  • Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
  • Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research question; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation.
  • Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
  • Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions.

 

Resources:

  • Technology: demo Internet-connected computer with data projector and screen; class set of Internet-connected computers (at least 1 per 2 students); all computers need a word processing or spreadsheet application software
  • Database aggregator such as Academic Search
  • http://newstimeline.googlelabs.com/
  • Google Docs, wiki, or other collaborative writing tool

 

Planning for Diverse Learners:

  • Have students work in pairs (one typical and one with needs, such as language or physical limitations)
  • Have students share equipment if there is limited access to it.
  • Pair English learners with native English speakers.
  • Provide choice of information sources
  • Provide more structure for the task or divide the steps into substeps
  • Topics may be sensitive for some students, so they should be able to choose their topics.

 

Instructional Strategies and Learning Activities:

  1. Prepare for the lesson by previewing the timeline website. Create a table in a Google Doc that students can add to. Make sure that all students can access the document.

 

2005

2006

2007

2008

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

President G. W. Bush visited China, asking them to stop pirating software, just as MicroSoft was introducing X-Box. MS could be seriously impacted by China’s growing technology expertise and exports. (Maurer, H. (2005). The Business Week. BusinessWeek, (3692), 32-33.)

 

 

 

 

  1. Ask students how they think that countries have been integrated into the world economy. Ask students what role technology has played in that integration. Generate a class list of technologies to guide the research.
  2. Have students access http://newstimeline.googlelabs.com/. Assign every two students one year. Have each one locate two Time magazine covers: one of a country and one of some type of technology. Have them right-click “copy image” onto the timeline table.
  3. Have students access Academic Search or similar article database aggregrator. Have them do a Boolean search of the two factors (country name and technology: example is “China” and “X-Box) and the year. Students need to find an article that links the two factors (with Academic Search the two terms are highlighted, which makes it easier to find). Have students write a paragraph linking with two factors, and explain the impact. They need to cite their source (Academic Search has a cite function, which makes this task very easy).
  4. Have each year’s students compare their images and analysis. Then , as a class, examine the resultant table of images, and interpret findings (by year, by country, by type of technology). First, see what patterns/trends students find, and then prompt them as needed.

 

Variations:

Focus on one region or one type of technology.

Focus on other aspects of society, such as popular culture or literature.

Use a different source of images.

 

Student Assessment:

Learners are assessed via their table contribution and class discussion. Criteria include:

  • Choice of images
  • Interpretation of linkage between factors
  • Choice of article
  • Citation
  • Interpretation of trends concerning technology’s role in country integration into the world.

Criteria are judged according to relevancy, accuracy, thoroughness, insightfulness.

 

12th Grade

Lesson Title: They Ad Up

 

Grade level: 12

 

Subject: Social Studies

 

Lesson Overview: Political advertising has been a mainstay of US politics since the beginning. Especially since the 1960s Presidential campaign with its use of television, the impact of mass media on shaping public opinion has been significant. The 2008 US Presidential campaign was radically impacted by the Internet, especially social networking. This lesson shows students how the “grammar” of mass media can be used to convey a message persuasively. Students have a hands-on opportunity to share mass media messages themselves.

 

Time Frame: 2 class periods

 

Learning Objectives: learners will

  • Explain how the language/grammar of mass media can be used to shape public opinion.
  • Discuss the role of mass media to communicate in American politics.
  • Apply mass media grammar to create a political ad.

 

Content Standards

  • Evaluate the roles of polls, campaign advertising, and the controversies over campaign funding.
  • Describe the means that citizens use to participate in the political process (e.g., voting, campaigning, lobbying, filing a legal challenge, demonstrating, petitioning, picketing, running for political office).
  • Discuss the meaning and importance of a free and responsible press.
  • Describe the roles of broadcast, print, and electronic media, including the Internet, as means of communication in American politics.
  • Explain how public officials use the media to communicate with the citizenry and to shape public opinion.

 

Library Standards (aligned with Common Core):

  • Search for information on Web sites using “tags” and hierarchical directories.
  • Search for information on Web sites using “tags” and hierarchical directories.
  • Use the hierarchy of a URL through successive truncations to navigate a site.
  • Search for information using advanced search skills (e.g., Boolean operators, adjacency, proximity, wild card symbols, truncation).
  • Differentiate between scholarly and popular publications in print or digital format.
  • Create and save searches and bibliographies within library catalogs and databases.
  • Select and use appropriate tools and technology to locate resources.
  • Identify, compare, and contrast the bibliographic information provided in a printed or digital book or a Web site.
  • Use a variety of print, media, and online resources to locate information including encyclopedias and other reference materials.
  • Demonstrate proper procedures and good citizenship online.
  • Use pre-search strategies to identify what should be read in depth (e.g., scan titles, headings, captions).
  • Verify the authenticity of primary and secondary source information found online.
  • Demonstrate respect for intellectual property, copyright restrictions, fair use, and public performance rights when downloading or duplicating media.
  • Use materials, equipment, and facilities responsibly and independently.
  • Explain how meaning is conveyed in image and sound and recognize that many media messages are constructed to gain profit and/or influence viewers.
  • Analyze design elements of various kinds of media productions and identify media messages that have embedded points of view.
  • Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words in order to address a question or solve a problem.
  • Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.

 

Resources:

  • Technology: demo Internet-connected computer with data projector and screen; class set of Internet-connected computers (at least 1 per 2 students); all computers need to be able to handle the Ad Maker function

 

Planning for Diverse Learners:

  • Have students work in pairs (one typical and one with needs, such as language or physical limitations)
  • Have students share equipment if there is limited access to it.
  • Pair English learners with native English speakers.
  • Pair typical and differently-abled students.
  • Provide choice of information sources
  • Provide more structure for the task or divide the steps into substeps
  • Allow students to express their thoughts through art.
  • Topics may be sensitive for some students, so they should be able to choose their topics.

 

 

Instructional Strategies and Learning Activities:

  1. Prepare for the lesson by previewing website, and testing video editing software. Choose at least one of the lessons located in the Teachers part of the  website. Set up equipment.
  2. Ask students to discuss campaign ads, and generate a class list of characteristics/criteria for assessing them. Ask students how the medium’s “grammar” impacts the message (e.g., camera angle, cropping of scene, presence of other figures such as children or criminals, music, narrative).
  3. Share http://www.livingroomcandidate.org/. Follow your chosen lesson. Note the difference between secondary and primary sources, and ask students to identify examples of each from the website.
  4. With the class, see how the same raw footage can be edited to communicate an opposing viewpoint by choosing either the AdMaker Nixon or Obama ad to change. Discuss the elements that can convey a point of view.
  5. In pairs have students make/re-edit an ad, using http://www.livingroomcandidate.org/admaker. Each student takes an opposing viewpoint. Alternatively, assign groups of 4 students, with pairs making opposing ads with the same raw footage. Each pair should write a one-page description of their intent, process, and use of media grammar.
  6. Have peers exchange ads, and evaluate each other’s according to the evaluation rubric http://www.livingroomcandidate.org/admaker.
  7. Debrief the class about media: its “grammar” and ways of shaping political opinion, impact of ads on campaigns. As a class, generate a list of ways (or advice) to become a critical ad viewer; this advice can be developed into an advertisement.

 

Variations:

  • Research the impact of political advertising on American politics (or politics in other countries).
  • Locate other raw footage or political campaign advertisements.
  • Research and analyze political campaign websites.
  • Develop a political campaign.
  • Study the history of political advertising.

 

Student Assessment:

Learners are assessed via observation of class participation and online behavior, and on their ad, ad description, and ad evaluation. Criteria for assessment include:

  • Appropriate online behavior
  • Appropriate and persuasive use of media grammar/element
  • Technical quality of ad
  • Thorough, analytical description of ad making intent and process
  • Appropriate and insightful analysis of political advertisement

 

1st Grade

Lesson Title: How Long Does It Take?

 

Grade level: 1

 

Subject: Mathematics

 

Lesson Overview: Different processes take different amounts of time. First graders can start to get a sense of time by finding out how much change occurs within a unit of time, and comparing process change speed by using the same units of time.

 

Time Frame: 2 class periods

 

Learning Objectives: learners will

  • Identify different times units of measure.
  • Explain reasons to use measurements of time.
  • Measure processes using time units of measure.
  • Compare processes using time units of measure.
  • Visually represent mathematical concepts.
     

Mathematics Standards (aligned with Common Core):

  • Understand and use numbers up to 100.
  • Tell and write time in hours and half-hours using analog and digital clocks.
  • Relate time to events (e.g., before/after, shorter/longer.
  • Students use direct comparison and nonstandard units to describe the measurements of objects.
  • Organize, represent, and compare data by category on simple graphs and charts.
  • Solve problems and justify their reasoning.
  • Note connections between one problem and another.

 

Library Standards (aligned with Common Core):

  • Understand the concept that printed and digital materials provide information by identifying meaning from simple symbols and pictures.
  • Connect the information and events found in print, media, and digital resources to prior knowledge.
  • Organize information in a logical sequence.
  • Communicate understanding by using at least once fact and/or photograph found in a current and credible source.
  • Share information orally and creatively with peers and other audiences.

 

Resources:

  • Technology: equipment for taking photographs (ideally, a class set of children’s digital cameras; note that some cell phones can take pictures without SIM cards, although the pictures cannot be transferred, so a class set of donated cell phones might be possible to use); ideally, a document stand with input device (SIM card, memory card, USB drive) to project images; ideally, one stop watch
  • Items to count (e.g., buttons, cubes, paper clips)
  • Ideally, a class set (1 per pair) of clipboards, each with paper and pencil
  • Calendar (preferably one with 1 page per month)
  • Large analog wall clock (or facsimile) with moveable hands

 

Planning for Diverse Learners:

  • Have students work in pairs (one typical and one with needs, such as language or physical limitations)
  • Have students share equipment if there is limited access to it.

 

Instructional Strategies and Learning Activities:

  1. Prepare for the lesson by gathering the cameras and other equipment, as available.

 

  1. Ask students what a clock is, and what its purpose is. Tell them that a clock measures time. Ask them why they would want to measure time (sample answers: to find out how long they can stay up, how long before they can eat a meal, how long a trip lasts, how long until their birthday). Explain that a length of time is measured in units: one hour is a unit of time. Ask them to identify other units of time: second, minute, day, week, etc.).

 

  1. To help students understand multiples of time, show a calendar. Counting the days in a week, weeks in a month, months in a year. To help them with a sense of scale, one week can be shown at a time, then the two weeks can be shown – and students can count up to 14. This can be continued up to a month. Alternatively, a wall clock can be used to add up hours.

 

  1. Ask students how they can compare how fast two people run (usual answer is a race). Ask them how they could compare speed if the two people (or more) do not run at the same time. The mathematical answer would be to measure speed over the same length of time, measured in units of time. As a way to show this, pair the students. Ask one person in each pair to do jumping jacks. Using a stop watch (or other clock), measure 1 minute; start students at the same time, and stop them at the same time: 1 minute. Ask the other student in the pair to count the number of jumping jacks COMPLETED. Student counters report out the number of jumping jacks, either orally with the teacher writing down the numbers publicly (whiteboard, newsprint, overhead projector film, sheet of paper under a document stand), or the students write down the numbers.  Pairs switch roles, and numbers are recorded again. Here is a sample recording grid.

 

Pair A

Pair B

Pair C

Pair D

Pair E

Pair F

Partner X

4

7

5

6

9

8

Partner Y

8

6

5

11

6

10

     

 

 

 

Ask the students to compare (which is more, which is less) figures within and across pairs. The latter is more difficult; see if the students can come up with a plan. One solution is to compare two pairs, and the pair with the larger number compares with another larger pair. The concept can also be extended such that A < B < C, etc. This may be shown visually:

__Pair A__

                  \__Pair A__

__Pair B__/                  \

                                       \__Pair D__

__Pair C__                     /

                  \__Pair D__/

            __Pair D__/

 

  1. Process what students learned. Mention that using a consistent measure of time is an fact-based, reliable (repeatable) way to draw conclusions.

 

  1. On day 2 (or the second hour), explain that different processes take different amounts of time, such as driving is faster than walking (it takes longer to get from point A to point B). Ask students for other examples (answers may be microwave and oven, drive-in fast food place and a sit-down restaurant). In these examples, the same kind of process is done in two different ways. Two different processes could be compared as well, with the time unit being the consistent measure: getting dressed versus going to the moon. Also, several processes could be compared.

 

  1. Ask students what kinds of processes happen on the playground (answers may be running, swinging, talking, etc.); ask each student (or pair) to choose one process to record. Distribute cameras to student pairs, and have them each practice taking a picture. Remind students that the images are for class data collection only, not to be shared with others. Give each pair a clipboard with a piece of paper and a pencil. Have them go to the playground when other students are there. Ask each student with a camera to take a picture, 1 per 10 seconds; it is easiest if the teacher keeps time, and shouts out when a minute has passed. Ask the student without the camera to keep track the number of times a process is done between pictures (making a hatch mark each time a process is completed, such as a full swing, or going down a slide); in some cases, the difference is distance, such as running (a linear process rather than a cyclical one). Have students take 6 pictures. If in pairs, have students switch the camera to the partner, and take pictures of the same process (6 pictures again). Bring the class inside.

 

  1. Ask students to compare two sets of pictures (using the camera’s play function), to determine which process is faster. Ask if there are other ways to compare the pictures (answer may be differences in speed between different time units, changes in quality of performance, changes due to slips, etc.). This comparison may be modeled using a document stand to project the images, or uploading pictures onto a computer, and projecting the images (ideally with a camera cable or a memory card reader USB drive). Ask students why they can make conclusions about comparing relative speeds/distances of processes (answer is the consistent time unit). Ask what processes might not be able to be captured in 10 second time units (answers can be blinking, talking, sitting, sun’s movement, grass growing, etc.). In those cases, what would be more meaningful units: from 1 second to 1 day.  Ask students to delete their pictures.

 

  1. Process learning from the two sessions: concept of time measurement (units) uses of using time as a measurement, use of factual information to draw conclusions, issues of privacy (taking pictures for data collection only).

 

  1. Ask students to measure two processes at home, and share them with the class for the next day. A worksheet may be used:

    

      TIME PROCESS:

     

Describe Process A:

 

Describe Process B:

Time unit used:

Time unit used:

Time to complete Process A:

Time to complete Process B:

Conclusions:

 

Variations:

  • Use a digital clock.
  • Focus on just cyclical processes.
  • Focus on just linear processes (such as plant growth, running in a straight line).
  • Use different time units for the activities.
  • Have students create a different time unit.
  • Have students use a different measuring unit, such as length or weight (volume is tricky because it is three-dimensional).

 

Student Assessment:

Assess students using observation, pictures, and worksheet. Assessment criteria include: 

  • active participation
  • following directions
  • completing tasks within the time frame
  • giving mathematically accurate answers
  • accurately comparing numerical information
  • making conclusions based on appropriate mathematical reasoning.

 

3rd Grade

Lesson Title: Adapting (to) the Environment

 

Grade level: 3

 

Subject: Science

 

Lesson Overview: Lately, students have witnessed how natural and human disasters such as Hurricane Katrina and the Gulf of Mexico oil spill impact living organisms (including humans). This activity shows how longer-term environmental changes impact wildlife. New Zealand is an interesting locale to explore because it enables students to see another part of the world, and tie environmental issues globally.

 

Time Frame: 1 class period; second class period for cyber-activism activity

 

Learning Objectives: learners will

Identify New Zealand plants and animals, and their environments.

Identify changes in their environment, and how those changes impacted New Zealand plants and animals.

Identify ways to improve the environment.
 

Science Standards (aligned with Common Core):

  • Students know living things cause changes in the environment in which they live: some of these changes are detrimental to the organism or other organisms, and some are beneficial.
  • Students know when the environment changes, some plants and animals survive and reproduce; others die or move to new locations.

 

Library Standards (aligned with Common Core):

  • Identify a problem that needs information by asking how, what, where, when, or why questions.
  • Use specialized content-area print and digital resources to locate information.
  • Apply techniques for organizing notes in a logical order (e.g., outlining, webbing, thinking maps, and other graphic organizers).
  • Select information appropriate to the problem or question at hand.
  • Determine if the information answers a simple question.
  • Select appropriate information technology tools and resources to interact with others for a specific purpose.

 

Resources:

  • Technology: Internet-connected demonstration computer with data projector and screen; at least one computer for every two students
  • http://www.kcc.org.nz/wildlife-and-wild-places
  • Writing tools and surfaces
  • Supplies for vocabulary building
  • Worksheet graphic organizer for each student:

      ORGANISM ADAPTATION:

 

               WHERE (environment):                                         HOW environment changed:

 

 

                    WHAT plant (or animal):      CHANGE             HOW organism ADAPTED:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Planning for Diverse Learners:

  • Have students work in pairs (one typical and one with needs, such as language or physical limitations)
  • Have students share equipment if there is limited access to it.
  • Pair English learners with native English speakers.
  • Pair typical and differently-abled students.
  • Provide choice of information sources.
  • Provide more structure for the task or divide the steps into substeps.
  • Allow students to express their thoughts through art.

 

Instructional Strategies and Learning Activities:

  1. Prepare for the lesson by previewing website. Set up equipment. Print graphic organizer. Create vocabulary cards for word wall/chart as appropriate (e.g., organism, habitat, adaptation, biome, environment).
  2. Ask students what environmental changes might impact plants. Ask them how plants respond/adapt (or not). Prompts can include: plant moved inside (plants bend toward light), rain (plants blossom), frost or drought (die). Ask the same question about animals. Ask what the basis is for environment change (answers: weather, natural disasters, humans). Remind students of Katrina and the Gulf of Mexico oil spill.
  3. Divide the class into pairs, and have each group choose one plant or animal found at http://www.kcc.org.nz/plant-life.
  4. Have groups log onto the website, and identify the organism, environment, environmental change, and adaptation using the graphic organizer. Then have similar groups (plants, birds, mammals, etc.) compare findings.
  5. As a class, process and synthesize the findings in terms of environment, changes, adaptations. Compare plants and animals.
  6. Ask students if such changes and adaptations occur locally; solicit concrete examples. Ask how local organisms, environments and adaptations differ or resemble those of New Zealand.
  7. Ask how humans can improve the environment to positively impact organisms. Become a cyber-activist: http://www.kcc.org.nz/become-cyber-activist. Ask students how New Zealanders have responded to the issue. Have students brainstorm ways that they can help local organisms adapt or keep healthy. Ask students to explore this site, and think of ways that they can take action.

 

Variations:

 

Student Assessment:

Learners are assessed via observation of class participation and online behavior, and their graphic organizers. Criteria for assessment include:

  • Accurate and complete description of organism, environment, change, and adaptation
  • Accurate and insightful description of environmental impact (negative and positive) on organisms
  • Appropriate use of graphic organizer

 

5th Grade

Lesson Title: Pies and Bars: Representing Information

 

Grade level: 5

 

Subject: Mathematics

 

Lesson Overview: Numerical information can be represented visually by graphs and charts. Such charts can facilitate analysis and comparisons. This activity builds on students’ information, motivating them to create meaningful graphical representations.

 

Time Frame: 1-2 class periods

 

Learning Objectives: learners will

  • Produce bar graphs and pie charts
  • Analyze and compare information represented by bar graphs and pie charts.
  • Explain what kind of information is represented best by different kinds of graphs and charts.
     

Mathematics Standards:

  • Organize and display single-variable data in appropriate graphs and representations (e.g., histogram, circle graphs) and explain which types of graphs are appropriate for various data sets.
  • Analyze problems by identifying relationships, distinguishing relevant from irrelevant information, sequencing and prioritizing information, and observing patterns.

 

Library Standards (aligned with Common Core):

  • Describe how media resources serve as sources for information, entertainment, persuasion, interpretation of events, and transmission of culture.
  • Demonstrates maturity in consideration of others, both in person and during communications and interactions using technology.

 

Resources:

  • Technology: Internet-connected demonstration computer with data projector and screen; ideally, one Internet-connected computer per student; ideally, a printer
  • http://www.shodor.org/interactivate/activities/
  • Writing instruments and surfaces

 

Planning for Diverse Learners:

  • Have students work in pairs (one typical and one with needs, such as language or physical limitations)
  • Have students share equipment if there is limited access to it.
  • Pair English learners with native English speakers.
  • Pair typical and differently-abled students.
  • Provide choice of information sources
  • Provide more structure for the task or divide the steps into substeps
  • Allow students to express their thoughts through art.
  • Topics may be sensitive for some students, so they should be able to choose their topics.

 

Instructional Strategies and Learning Activities:

  1. Prepare for the lesson by previewing the website. Set up equipment.
  2. Ask students how they spend their day. Have them write down their activities for a school day, and for Saturday, assigning a number of hours for each activity.
  3. Demonstrate http://www.shodor.org/interactivate/activities/CircleGraph. Read aloud the explanation about pie charts, explaining any unclear aspects. Have students log onto the website, and have them go to the Activity section. Then ask them to create a pie chart based on their information. If possible, have them print the charts.
  4. Next, explain bar graphs using http://www.shodor.org/interactivate/activities/BarGraph/). Have students create a bar graph with the same data using the activities section. If possible, have them print the graphs. Ask students which chart is more meaningful/useful, and explain why.
  5. Have pairs of students compare charts, and ask them to report out their findings relative to the use of their charts. Students should mention that inconsistent labels and specificity make it difficult to compare. Have the class generate a list of labels, at a consistent level (either in terms of depth of hours), and then reconstruct the charts. Then ask them to compare, and note how the representation of information can impact analysis. Ask students what kind of chart would be better for making comparisons; how would a bar graph have to be modified to optimize comparisons? (answer: generate a chart that combines the sets of data).
  6. Ask students what other kinds of data are best represented by pie charts, by bar graphs.
  7. If time allows, generate a class spreadsheet using Google Docs, and generate comparison charts.

 

Variations:

  • Use a spreadsheet program that converts to graphs.
  • Use a spreadsheet to generate basic statistics.
  • Explore other types of graphs/charts to represent statistical information.
  • Use other types of data.

 

Student Assessment:

Learners are assessed via observation of class participation, oral presentation and online behavior; and by the graphs/charts. Criteria for assessment include:

  • Accurate, complete charts/graphs
  • Accurate, complete, insightful comparison of charts/graphs

 

7th Grade

Lesson Title: Dance with Style

 

Grade Level: 7

 

Subject: Performing Arts -- Dance

 

Lesson Overview: Many styles of dance exist, which often reflect cultural and musical characteristics. Video format, with its ability to capture movement and ability to be paused and rerun, can facilitate dance style analysis. This lesson enables students to apply their knowledge to inform creative expression.

 

Time Frame: 3 class periods

 

Learning Objectives: learners will

  • Critically analyze dance styles.
  • Identify cultural and musical influence on dance styles.
  • Apply dance styles to original dance design and performance.
     

Dance Standards:

  • Demonstrate understanding of the elements of dance and the craft of choreography when critiquing two kinds of dance (e.g., solo, duet).
  • Identify assessment criteria used for outstanding performances in different styles of dance (e.g., theatre, social, ceremonial).

 

Library Standards (aligned with Common Core):

  • Identify scholarly, accurate, and current sources of information in a variety of formats.
  • Understand and demonstrate appropriate use of “tags” for online resources.
  • Evaluate sources for fact, opinion, propaganda, currency, and relevance.
  • Evaluate credibility, comprehensiveness and usefulness of print, nonprint, and digital information sources.
  • Identify and assess evidence that supports ideas and concepts presented in audio and visual media.
  • Evaluate information from visual media as a primary and secondary source and distinguish the difference.

 

Resources:

 

Planning for Diverse Learners:

  • Have students work in pairs (one typical and one with needs, such as language or physical limitations).
  • Have students share equipment if there is limited access to it.
  • Provide choice of information sources
  • Provide more structure for the task or divide the steps into substeps.
  • Allow students to express their thoughts through art.
  • Mobile-limited students can serve as choreographers, or dance can accommodate differences (think “Glee”).

 

Instructional Strategies and Learning Activities:

  1. Prepare for the lesson by previewing video websites, or check the availability of video streaming service. Set up equipment.
  2. Ask students to describe different styles of dancing. Ask students to identify dances that reflect a culture (such as tango, belly dancing, Virginia reel). Share representative dances found at  http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/dihtml/divideos.html. Lead a class discussion about analyzing dance styles by comparing two dance styles (such as the tango and the schottische. Have students generate a list of criteria by which to analyze dances (e.g., musical elements, rhythm, body movement, human interaction, costuming, etc.).
  3. In groups of 2-4 students, have them analyze a dance by observing a video version of the dance. Aim for at least two versions of dance in order to determine common and unique characteristics. Have each group document their analysis according to the class criteria.
  4. Have each group then create a dance that uses at least two steps in one style. Have them think of a way to document their dance movements, and implement that approach. Videotape group’s dances if possible
  5. Exchange analysis sheets, making sure to take off the dance style and students; name. As the dances are performed, see if the rest of the class can identify the intended dance style.
  6. Debrief the class in terms of dance styles, how dance reflects culture, how music impacts dance style, how dance steps can be represented, how video informs their analysis and design, and the difference between secondary and primary sources.

 

Variations:

  • Focus on dance notation.
  • Focus on one continent or culture.
  • Focus on variations of one dance.
  • Focus on folk dances.
  • Trace the “migration” or cultural variations of dance styles (e.g., several countries claim the origin of the “Hokey Pokey”).
  • Start with music, and generate dances.

 

Student Assessment:

Learners are assessed via observation of class participation and performance, and by dance analysis and documentation. Criteria for assessment include:

  • Relevant, thorough, appropriate analysis of dance steps
  • Correct identification of dance styles
  • Relevant and appropriate application of dance steps

 

9th Grade

Lesson Title: Getting Informed and Informing

 

Grade level: 9

 

Subject: Health education

 

Lesson Overview: As teens make decisions about relationships and sexual health, they need to know how to locate and evaluate relevant information. They also need to think about their privacy as they seek such information. This lesson examines the communication cycle, and notes how information technology impacts it. It also addresses how communication is recorded and shared, which can impact privacy. Both legal and ethical issues are addressed.

 

Time frame: 2 class periods

 

Student Outcomes:  Learners will

  • Describe how to find information about health issues
  • Evaluate sources of information
  • Explain the impact of technology on locating and sharing information

 

Health Education Standards:

  • Analyze the validity of health information, products, and services related to reproductive and sexual health
  • Use a decision-making process to examine barriers to making healthy decisions about relationships and sexual health
  • Use a decision-making process to analyze when it is necessary to seek help with or leave an unhealthy situation
  • Use a decision-making process to evaluate the use of FDA-approved condoms and other contraceptives for pregnancy and STD prevention
  • Support others in making positive and healthful choices about sexual behavior

 

Library Standards:

  • Select and use appropriate tools and technology to locate resources
  • Use a variety of print, media and online resources to locate information including encyclopedias and other reference materials
  • Analyze media for purpose, message, accuracy, bias, and intended audience
  • Determine whether resources are designed to persuade, educate, inform, or sell
  • Recognize and protect the private information of oneself and others

 

Common Core Standards:

            - Analyze in detail how an author’s ideas or claims are developed and refined

            - Read and comprehend literary nonfiction

- Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation

- Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research question

- Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

 

Resources:

  • Internet-connected computers
  • Worksheet

 

Planning for Diverse Learners:

  • Pair English learners with native English speakers.
  • Pair typical and differently-abled students.
  • Provide choice of information sources
  • Provide more structure for the task or divide the steps into substeps
  • Allow students to express their thoughts through art.
  • Topics may be sensitive for some students, so they should be able to choose their topics.

 

Instructional Strategies and Learning Activities:

            The communication cycle begins with an idea that someone tries to communicate to another person, usually with in the intent that the receiving party responds. The communication channel can impact the message and its receiver/audience. While a response to the sender is typically completes the loop, the audience could communicate to other parties.  An image of the communication cycle is found at http://www.media-visions.com/communication.html.

            This model also works for seeking information, with the intent that the receiver provides the sender with the needed information. The sender’s choice of communications channel impacts who will receive the query. The communications channel may be public (open to anyone) or private (directed to an intended receiver), and the message may be documented or not. The sender also needs to think about the receiver in terms of whether the message will be sent only to the sender (a closed cycle) or might be communicated to others (an open cycle).

            Students as information seekers/senders need to think about the communication channel, the receiver, and privacy factors. Particularly since issues of relationships and sexual health may be sensitive in nature, students often do not want their communication to be made public. Furthermore, they might not realize the consequences of sharing such information. This lesson helps them understand these issues.

           

1. Have students brainstorm feasible relationships and sexual health scenarios that require information seeking. Here is a beginning list (which may be used as the lesson topics):

- A teenager is seriously dating, and is considering becoming sexually intimate. He or she is seeking information about whether to take that ultimate step, thinking about its consequences.

- A teenage couple has decided to become sexually intimate. They have heard that condoms should be used, but they think that condoms might make the experience less pleasurable or imply a calculated action rather than spontaneous love. They (or one) want to know what to do.

- A teenage girl’s period is late. She wants to know her options. She also is trying to decide whether to tell her boyfriend – or the male who impregnated her.

 

2. Have students brainstorm technology-based communication channels that could be used to get the desired information. Alternatively, the following list may be used as a guiding or final list.

- telephone conversation

- smart phone texting

- email

- Internet searching

- Facebook/social network query

 

3. Split the class into groups according to communication channel. Have each group identify if their channel is public or private. Have student groups also identify whether their channel records/archives the information. Have them research how many people might potentially access the information (e.g., http://www.facebook.com/press/info.php?statistics).

 

4. Have students brainstorm likely receivers/audience of the query. Examples include: parent, teacher, friend, romantic partner, doctor, clergy, social agency. Have each student within each group choose to be one receiver. Have each group identify the likely kind of information that they would give (e.g., clergy would advise abstinence, doctor would give medical information, etc.). If students are unsure about what kind of information that would be given, have them research it (e.g., using Internet search engine or database aggregator key word combinations such as “condoms” and “Planned Parenthood”). Have each group discuss their findings.

 

5. Have students predict whether their source of information (receiver/respondent) would be likely to: 1) respond directly to them; 2) tell others about the communication. If students are unsure about what kind of information that would be given, have them research the answer (e.g.,

 

6. Have students discuss within their group about the consequences of the communications cycle being open/public.

 

7. Pose the question: “What if someone were to overhear/access the query?” What might be the consequences? For instance, if someone saw a teenage girl walking into a Planned Parenthood agency, and told others that the girl was pregnant when she really was asking about condoms, what would be the consequences for the: 1) girl who visited, and 2) person/interloper who told others untrue gossip? Have groups discuss the issue and ramifications. Some of the terminology that might arise includes: libel, slander, false representation; these terms can be researched by the groups.

 

8. Have each group report out their findings and predictions about consequences of actions. If the class is large, split them into two or three groups, each with a separate issue.

 

9. Conduct a class debriefing about locating and sharing information via technology about relationship and sexual health issues. Have the class develop guidelines for behaviors relative to technology use.

 

Assessment:

Grade students according to their communication thoroughness, validity, and justification for the following criteria:

  • following directions
  • documenting work
  • collecting information/conducting research
  • understanding the communication cycle
  • understanding the impact of technology
  • understanding issues of privacy
  • making recommendations for decision making.

 

 

 

 

            RESEARCH WORKSHEET

 

  1. Issue:

 

 

  1. Communications channel:

      Public or private?                                      Likely to be recorded/archived?

      Potential number of people who could access/receive the message:

 

  1. Audience/receiver:

      Likely type of information to be provided:

      Likelihood of keeping communication private:

      Likelihood of sharing communication (making it public):

 

  1. Consequences of interloping (to interloper and target person):

 

 

5.  Recommendations for locating and sharing information:

     

11th Grade

Lesson Title: Collective Intelligence about 1920s American Literature

 

Grade level: 11

 

Subject: English

 

Lesson Overview: American literature reflects social realities. This lesson enables students to consult primary sources to see how contemporary people experienced the time period, and then apply those points of view to seminal literature. The activity also leverages each student’s research to combine new knowledge into an analytical synthesis.

 

Time Frame: 2-3 class periods

 

Learning Objectives: learners will

  • Locate and extract information from primary sources about 1920s social trends
  • Determine the impact of social trends on seminal 1920s American literary works.
  • Collaborate to synthesize information.
  • Take notes and cite sources accurately.

 

English Standards (aligned with Common Core):

  • Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.
  • Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in terms of the task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and overreliance on any one source and following a standard format for citation including footnotes and endnotes.
  • Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
  • Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions
  • Analyze the clarity and consistency of political assumptions in a selection of literary works or essays on a topic (e.g., suffrage, women's role in organized labor). (Political approach)
    Analyze the philosophical arguments presented in literary works to determine whether the authors'             positions have contributed to the quality of each work and the credibility of the characters.             (Philosophical approach)
  • Analyze recognized works of American literature representing a variety of genres and traditions:
    1. Trace the development of American literature from the colonial period forward.
    2. Contrast the major periods, themes, styles, and trends and describe how works by members of different cultures relate to one another in each period.
    3. Evaluate the philosophical, political, religious, ethical, and social influences of the historical period that shaped the characters, plots, and settings.

 

Library Standards (aligned with Common Core):

  • Identify the capabilities and limitations of tools for organizing and using information.
  • Produce media efficiently and appropriately to communicate a message to an audience.
  • Organize personal digital information using metadata, keywords, and tags.
  • Search for information using both controlled vocabulary (e.g., subject headings, descriptors) and natural language.
  • Evaluate online search results, demonstrating an understanding of how search engines determine rank or relevancy.
  • Understand the differences between quoting, summarizing, and paraphrasing and apply these skills to own work.
  • Use appropriate conventions for documentation in the text, footnotes, references, and bibliographies by adhering to an acceptable format.
  • Construct and test hypotheses; collect, evaluate, and employ information from multiple primary and secondary sources; and apply it in oral and written presentations using appropriate citations.
  • Analyze important ideas and supporting evidence in an information source, using logic and informed             judgment to accept or reject information.
  • Contribute actively to the learning community and participate in groups to pursue and generate information.
  • Use technology to communicate, share information, and collaborate with others with the same interests.

 

Resources:

 

Planning for Diverse Learners:

  • Have students work in pairs (one typical and one with needs, such as language or physical limitations)
  • Have students share equipment if there is limited access to it.
  • Pair typical and differently-abled students.
  • Provide choice of information sources
  • Provide more structure for the task or divide the steps into substeps

 

Instructional Strategies and Learning Activities:

  1. Prepare for the lesson by previewing the websites. Set up three wikis.
  2. Ask students how society impacts literature. Ask students to create individual concept maps of social, philosophical, political, religious, and ethical trends occurring during the 1920s. Have students pair-share their concept maps, and report out a couple of insights.
  3. Divide the class into thirds: The Great Gatsby, Babbitt, Their Eyes Were Watching Go. Then divide those thirds into five groups, one for each type of trend: social, philosophical, political, religious, and ethical.
  4. http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/browse/index.html. Explain that American Memory is a set of collections of digitized primary documents. Having the class limit their search to 1920-1929, ask the trends-based groups to locate relevant documents from American Memory, and extract information that pertains to their book, placing notes on the book wiki, creating a separate page for each type of trend. Make sure that students cite their sources correctly (http://www.csulb.libguides.com/style). Ask each group to compare their findings, and inform each other as appropriate.
  5. Have the class regroup by book, and share their findings by synthesizing the trend pages intro a front page describing how the trends impact the book’s characters, plots, and setting. 
  6. Ask the class to read and assess each other’s wikis according to the analytical rubric (http://www2.uwstout.edu/content/profdev/rubrics/wikirubric.html).
  7. Debrief the class relative to the trends and their impact to the book. Discuss how the trends of the decade could result in such different representations of America.

 

Variations:

  • Locate other documents.
  • Focus on other decades.
  • Use other collaborative tools.
  • Focus on one type of social impact over time.

 

Student Assessment:

Learners are assessed via observation of online behavior and class participation, and the wikis. Criteria for assessment include:

  • Appropriate online behavior
  • Quantity and quality of analysis and synthesis
  • Quantity and quality of collaboration
  • Identification trends that impact American literature